Geography of Morocco

Morocco, a wonderland of landscapes

At the crossroads of Europe and Africa, surrounded by Mediterranean waters and opening onto the vastness of the Atlantic ocean, Morocco is a wonderland for nature lovers.

It is the "land of the distant sunset", a destination rich in contrasts, with a two thousand year-old history, that will stimulate your curiosity. In these lands where several dynasties succeeded one another, you’ll discover remains of the greatest Mediterranean civilizations. In the north of the country, the Roman ruins of Volubilis stand.

In Rabat, pieces of architecture are evidence of the ancient French presence. Everywhere else, there are several treasures tracing the Muslim civilizations : the Kasbah of the Oudayas, the green expanses of the Menara gardens.

Between sea and mountains, desert sands and green plains, eye-popping panoramas are displayed to shower you with tranquility and natural beauty; enchanting vivid pictures with the richness of a brawling culture transport you into a most raw nature.

Moroccan Atlas


The Middle Atlas 3356 m

The Middle Atlas, which is touristic, offers a diversity of landscapes. Rich in fauna and flora, it presents a colourful picture of lakes, forests of holm oaks, cork oaks and deserted volcanic plateaus.

Spread over 350 kilometres, the massifs of the Middle Atlas cover several regions of Morocco: Ifrane, Khenifra, Sefrou, Boulmane, Midelt, Hajeb, Taza and Beni-mellal.

Moreover, these massifs belong to four water basins: the Sebou basin, the Bouregreg basin, the Oum Errabiaa basin and the Moulouya basin. The first three water basins flow into the Atlantic and the last one into the Mediterranean.

haut atlas
The High Atlas 4167 m

The High Atlas, commonly known as the "roof of Morocco", is home to the highest peak in North Africa (Djbel Toubkal with 4,167 meters high).

Stretching over 750 kilometres in length, the massifs of the High Atlas separate three parts of Morocco: Atlantic Morocco, Mediterranean Morocco and Saharan Morocco. With its Amazigh character, its inhabitants practise livestock farming and agriculture, which also represent the main economic pillars of the High Atlas.

Apart from its tourist attractiveness, the High Atlas is known internationally not only for its national park for the preservation of natural biodiversity, but also for its archaeological sites.


Anti Atlas 3304 m

The Anti-Atlas, which is a chain recognized by its excessive aridity, hosts modest summits with Jbel Siroua (3 300 m) being the highest peak.

Like the High Atlas and the Middle Atlas, all its massifs has an astonishing diversity  in terms of fauna and flora, geology and culture with Amazigh charm. Its arid character is due to its proximity to the Saharan lands since its last rampart is just before the "Hamada du Draâ".

Previously unknown, the crossing of the Anti-Atlas mountains represents today a modern circuit, rich in landscapes and leisure activities.

 

 

The High Atlas
The High Atlas

The High Atlas, commonly known as the "roof of Morocco", is home to the highest peak in North Africa (Djbel Toubkal with 4,167 meters high).

Stretching over 750 kilometres in length, the massifs of the High Atlas separate three parts of Morocco: Atlantic Morocco, Mediterranean Morocco and Saharan Morocco. With its Amazigh and Berber character, its inhabitants practise livestock farming and agriculture, which also represent the main economic pillars of the High Atlas.

Apart from its tourist attractiveness, the High Atlas is known internationally not only for its national park for the preservation of natural biodiversity, but also for its archaeological sites.

The Middle Atlas
The Middle Atlas

The Middle Atlas, which is touristic, offers a diversity of landscapes. Rich in fauna and flora, it presents a colourful picture of lakes, forests of holm oaks, cork oaks and deserted volcanic plateaus.

Spread over 350 kilometres, the massifs of the Middle Atlas cover several regions of Morocco: Ifrane, Khenifra, Sefrou, Boulmane, Midelt, Hajeb, Taza and Beni-mellal.

Moreover, these massifs belong to four water basins: the Sebou basin, the Bouregreg basin, the Oum Errabiaa basin and the Moulouya basin.

The first three water basins flow into the Atlantic and the last one into the Mediterranean.

Anti Atlas
Anti Atlas

The Anti-Atlas, which is a chain recognized by its excessive aridity, hosts modest summits with Jbel Siroua (3 300 m) being the highest peak.

Like the High Atlas and the Middle Atlas, all its massifs has an astonishing diversity  in terms of fauna and flora, geology and culture with Amazigh charm.

Its arid character is due to its proximity to the Saharan lands since its last rampart is just before the "Hamada du Draâ".

Previously unknown, the crossing of the Anti-Atlas mountains represents today a modern circuit, rich in landscapes and leisure activities.

The Atlantic Ocean
The Atlantic Ocean

The Atlantic Ocean stretches more than 1,300 km to the west of the kingdom, offering a living space to several cities on its coast.

In the south of the Atlantic coast are Agadir, Tiznit, Dakhla and other cities, are rich in culture, history and leisure activities, due to their geographical advantage.

Up to the north, you’ll come across the cities of Essaouira, El Jadida, Casablanca and Rabat which are just as famous as those in the south.

An Atlantic coast, which consequently connects the Sahara to northwest Morocco, combines several cultures: traditional and modern; and offers a sweet spot for water sports lovers from all over the world.

The Mediterranean Sea
The Mediterranean Sea

The Mediterranean Sea stretches over 500 kilometres from the North-East to the North-West of Morocco.

One of the most outstanding features of the country is the calm azure blue waters and fine golden sands, which attracts many Moroccan and foreign visitors every summer.

From Tangier to the far east of Morocco, the sea breeze mixed with the Arab-Andalusian culture charms its visitors who are travelling far to stay in the most beautiful coasts of the world, to discover the hidden treasures of the wild beaches and to enjoy sunbathing on pebbled sands.

 

 

 

 

Dakhla
Dakhla

An absolute beauty to match every taste, Dakhla is a place for anyone wishing to indulge in the beauty of the sand dunes overlooking the Atlantic Ocean.

Sunny all year round, there is nothing better than swimming in winter or autumn under a 25-degree sun or enjoying the leisure activities of its internationally renowned clubs.

In Dakhla, PK25 and Foum El Bouir are the two famous beaches in the region. You can swim there, have fun, relax and enjoy all the activities of snow sports.

Merzouga Desert
Merzouga desert

For a night under the stars or in a bivouac, for long hikes on the sand dunes and for a unique experience in the middle of the Moroccan desert, the Merzouga desert will shower you with its austere beauty.

Merzouga is one of the doors that open to the Saharan vastness, with its ochre-brown colour, under a beautiful sunshine.

At sunrise or sunset, you’ll enjoy a breathtaking landscape. In bivouac, you’ll enjoy all the folk festivities and the exceptional Saharan culture. On the back of a camel, admire all the wild landscapes.

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